Please Gogh, I promise it’s worth it: Cleveland’s Van Gogh experience review

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Margaret Skubik '22

Van Gogh’s Les Tournesols (The Sunflowers) projected in the exhibit.

Margaret Skubik, Staff Reporter

Picture this: It’s a gloomy winter day in Cleveland and you’re craving an escape. The sunshine has disappeared and bitterness of the snow overshadows any starry night. Alas, Van Gogh exhibit designer Massimiliano Siccardi has your solution. 

…lie down and gaze upon the breathtaking art in front of you.”

Van Gogh’s La Nuit Étoilée (The Starry Night) show in the exhibit. (Margaret Skubik ’22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sit back, relax and immerse yourself in 600,000 cubic feet of projection animation illuminating the stunning authenticity and creative genius that is Vincent Van Gogh. Though no paintings are in the space, the giant projections are carved perfectly with every detailed brushstroke and color that showcases even more than the paintings. 

The exhibit that’s been wowing people across twenty different cities and has surpassed $3.2 million in ticket sales, making it the most successful attraction in the world on Ticketmaster according to Bloomberg, is sure to leave a lasting impression. As you approach a seemingly empty warehouse at 850 E 72nd St #1007 in  Cleveland, you enter and are immediately immersed in Van Gogh’s color schemes, portraits and quotes. The exhibit itself resembles a dark theatre, but here the viewers are almost inside the screen rather than passive audience members. You are free to walk around, take pictures or just lie down and gaze upon the breathtaking art in front of you. 

From his sunny landscapes and yellow hues to night scenes and still life paintings, every piece is brought to life and seen in a newfound light. The installation includes les Mangeurs de pommes de terre (The Potato Eaters, 1885), la Nuit étoilée (Starry Night, 1889), Les Tournesols (Sunflowers, 1888), and La Chambre à coucher (The Bedroom, 1889) and more. 

Margaret Skubik pictured in front of the Van Gogh-esque Cleveland sign. (Matt Springer ’22)

The installation is about an hour long and runs on a loop so viewers are free to stay and watch it multiple times. I would personally recommend watching it twice in order to fully grasp every painting and story behind the work. When finished, wander right over to the giftshop section and pick up a mug, poster, tote bag or any Van Gogh inspired goodie of your choosing. If you’re in Cleveland for the holidays and looking for a perfect gift, the exhibit is now running until Feb. 6 and tickets begin at $39.99.